After Haiyan: building back better

In November 2013, Super Typhoon Haiyan, one of the largest storms ever recorded, hit the Philippines. More than 6,000 people perished in the storm and over 4 million people were displaced. With the help of our supporters, we are working alongside Caritas Philippines and 41 other agencies as the country enters a phase of recovery and rehabilitation.


After the typhoon we didn’t know what to do, but after Caritas came, we knew there was hope and they helped us start again."

From emergency relief to rebuilding

Soon after the typhoon struck, the Caritas network was on the ground providing immediate emergency assistance to those affected. 

Thanks to the generous support of the Australian Catholic community, and the Australian Government,  we're still helping typhoon-affected communities recover, rehabilitate and 'build back better'.

One year on, our network has provided over 370,000 people with essential food, emergency shelter, health, hygiene and household kits, early livelihood recovery support, and psychosocial services.

The videos below tell stories of how your support has helped.


Mary Faith and family

Find out how your support has made a difference in our Super Typhoon Haiyan update, Nov 2014. (1MB PDF)

Our ongoing work at a glance

We continue to support Philippines communities as they recover and rehabilitate:

  • Reconstructing and repairing homes with typhoon-resilient features such as improved design, strong materials, quality workmanship and safer locations.
  • Improving access to safe, clean water and sanitary facilities.
  • Restoring and diversifying livelihoods.
  • Rehabilitating the local ecosystems.

Some examples of our work:

Livelihood support is helping farming families to re-establish their income and stability. So far, 328 fishing families have received 105 fishing boats and motors, 17,918 farming families have received vegetable seeds
and small garden tools, and 3,179 farming families have received poultry birds.

Cash for work opportunities are providing thousands of people the opportunity to earn an income. In return for income, local people are building emergency shelters and helping in the clean-up process.

Disaster risk reduction work to build greater resilience in communities should a natural disaster of this size and scale ever occur again.

Advocating for people who are experiencing problems with issues such as land rights, identity documentation (which can hamper access to assistance), family separation, labour exploitation, social exclusion, violence towards women, and human trafficking.

Read more about our work in our Super Typhoon Haiyan update, November 2014 (1MB PDF).