Pakistan Floods - 3 years on

Women pumping clean water from a water pump in Pakistan

It's been three years since Pakistan's worst floods devastated the country in 2010, affecting over 20 million people. Millions were again affected in 2011 and 2012 when severe flooding once again forced families from their homes and caused widespread destruction. Homes were destroyed, fields were waterlogged, stored seeds and grains were ruined and small livestock had perished.

What's happened?

Since 2010, a lot of great work has been done. The Caritas network has helped over 39,000 households rebuild their lives and livelihoods as part of a large scale emergency and recovery program. Emergency kits have been distributed and a number of relief activities have been conducted to help communities recover for the longer term. These include shelter reconstruction, water, sanitation and hygiene developments, health assistance, sustainable agriculture training, cash for work programs, livestock restocking and disaster risk reduction initiatives.

Browse the photo gallery below to see some of the recent humanitarian assistance programs that have helped flood-affected communities in Sindh and Balochistan.



Pakistan Floods Response Media gallery

Housing construction after the Pakistan floods

Rebuilding homes has been an important part of relief efforts following the Pakistan floods. This house is an example of the mud plastering completed by beneficiaries, which helps regulate temperatures during the extreme heat of summer and the harsh cold winter.

Credit: Catholic Relief Services (CRS)

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Water pump constructed

CRS' water, sanitation and hygiene initiatives include hygiene promotion, improved access to clean water for drinking and cooking through disinfection, repair and replacement of damaged hand pumps, water ponds, hygiene promotion and distribution of water purification tablets.

Credit: Catholic Relief Services (CRS)

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Livestock voucher

Livestock is an essential livelihoods activity in Sindh that provides milk, yoghurt and meat for families. One initiative that has helped flood affected communities rebuild their livelihoods, is the distribution of livestock vouchers for restocking livestock lost in the floods.

Credit: Catholic Relief Services (CRS)

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Shelter construction

With community participation, the Caritas network has helped vulnerable households rebuild their homes. Disaster risk reduction measures have been put in place, which include raising the land at least two feet from the ground and building a drainage moat to mitigate the risk of future flooding.

Credit: Catholic Relief Services (CRS)

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(JPG 105KB)

Kitchen gardens

Kitchen gardens enable families to feed themselves and earn an income by selling the excess produce. Caritas has conducted kitchen garden training sessions and distributed gardening tool kits and vegetable seeds to families affected by the Pakistan floods.

Credit: Catholic Relief Services (CRS)

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Seed bag from Caritas Australia

To support seed protection and improve seed storage, the Caritas network provided households with seed storage bags in time for the rice and wheat harvests. This seed bag from Caritas Australia is filled with Kharif rice seed in a community in Kashmore, Sindh.

Credit: Catholic Relief Service (CRS)

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Access to clean water

Water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) has been a key part of relief efforts. The Caritas network aims to ensure that flood affected households have sufficient quantities of clean water to meet their essential household needs.

Credit: Catholic Relief Services (CRS)

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(JPG 47KB)

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